September 10, 2015

Sept 2015 Newsletter

Summer has all too quickly passed. Here at the Museum we mark this passing with the return of our summer guides to their studies. We were pleased again this year to provide summer employment for young people from the community. Again this year we were blessed with intelligent, enthusiastic and courteous guides. Several visitors commented favourably on their experience in working with these young ambassadors. We wish Fadila, Kelsey, Logan and Chad the best in their studies.
July 21, 2015

Windsor Family Powerhouse: Windsor streets and the families who named them

FOR GENERATIONS, hoofs, feet and tires have tread on the, often pothole ridden, streets of Windsor, Nova Scotia. If you’ve lived here since birth, you know exactly where every short-cut is. You know that the driveway that cuts between the curling rink and the bottle depot saves you at least 4 minutes of walking time. And you can probably tell when you’re talking to someone who hails from Chester Road. But, what you may not know is how your street became a part of history.
October 10, 2012
CliftonHouse_WindsorNS

WHHS Newsletter: October 2012 – Thomas Chandler Haliburton

The Life of Thomas Chandler Haliburton by Mark MacGillivray Thomas Chandler Haliburton was born in Windsor, Nova Scotia on December 17, 1796. He was the son of a known political figure named William Haliburton. His mother died as Thomas was only a year old, so he was raised by his stepmother named Susanna. Growing up in an aristocratic household, young Haliburton attended King’s College from which he received a B.A. in 1815 at the age of 18, beginning his carrier which would eventually land him a job as a judge.
June 6, 2012
Windsor Covered Bridge, c.1887

Welcome to our website and blog!

Since much of this area’s history was shaped by the water it seems only fair to have the first blog topic relate to this theme. The WHHS has many photographs of the bridges that have spanned the Avon River. The photo here shows the Windsor Covered Bridge and Train Bridge and dates to sometime before 1887. Before the construction of a bridge across the Avon travel was more of a waiting game. One would have to wait for the tide to come in to cross by boat or risk crossing the sandy floor bed at low tide-neither being great choices for a traveller in a hurry.